Mongo DB

Posted on August 2, 2011. Filed under: learn for free, mongodb, MongoDB: The Definitive Guide by Kristina Chodorow and Michael Dirolf |

The Wiki describes about the Mongo DB as

“MongoDB (from “humongous”) is an open source, high-performance, schema-free, document-oriented database written in the C++ programming language.[1] The database is document-oriented so it manages collections of JSON-like documents. Many applications can thus model data in a more natural way, as data can be nested in complex hierarchies and still be query-able and indexable.”

Features Among the features are:

Consistent UTF-8 encoding. Non-UTF-8 data can be saved, queried, and retrieved with a special binary data type.
Cross-platform support: binaries are available for Windows, Linux, OS X, and Solaris. MongoDB can be compiled on almost any little-endian system.
Type-rich: supports dates, regular expressions, code, binary data, and more (all BSON types)
Cursors for query results”

Now we require a Book which says it all, considering we have to download, install and work the same out for any SQL database, and also for making any projects.

I have included the file for the “MongoDB: The Definitive Guide by Kristina Chodorow and Michael Dirolf” for people who want to learn for themselve, improving the skills and enlightening their life.

“THE FILE INCLUDED IS FOR PERSONAL AND EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY!! THERE IS NO COMMERCIAL ASPECT FOR THE SAME. KINDLY CONSIDERED IF YOU WANT TO DONATE THE AUTHOR OR ARE USING FOR THE COMMERICAL PURPOSES”

RESPECTIVE MATERIAL BELONG TO THE RESPECTIVE OWNERS OR AUTHORS

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